georgian-architecture

The spaces we occupy

Architecture is a key front in the elite’s war to erode tradition and establish a global monoculture, from the domestic level to our public buildings and spaces. Whatever one thinks of Foucault, a point that can be drawn from his study on panopticism in Discipline and Punish is key to understanding…

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Frederick Richardson, Art Nouveau artist and author

Frederick Richardson was a Chicago artist of the Art Nouveau style who created the artwork for many memorable children’s books and classic Western fables. His rich and colourful style and rejection of Modernism, including illustrating a book about the follies of the new abstract art, put him firmly in the traditional…

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May Day Rituals and pinch-bum day

May is named for the Greek Goddess Maia. It is celebrated as the midway period between spring and summer equinox, when the sprouts begin to emerge for the growing season. Known in Ireland as the Bealtaine celebration, 30th April &1st May (May Eve & May Day) has several associated traditions which…

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Blúiríní Béaloidis – Irish May Day Folklore

The first of May is marked in Ireland (and across Europe more broadly), as a day on which the summer is welcomed in; where garlands of flowers decorate the houses, in which young women of the locality bring cattle up to higher summer pastures to graze, in which the community…

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Excerpt from The Painted Word by Tom Wolfe.

In his book “The Painted Word”, Tom Wolfe cited Clement Greenberg, Harold Rosenberg and Leo Steinberg as the kings of “Cultureburg”. Wolfe claimed these critics were dominating the world of art with Modernist theories and that, unlike the world of literature in which anyone can buy a book, the world of fine art…

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Courage, Heroism & the Hound of Culann

Just above ground level in the broad window of the General Post Office on Dublin’s O’Connell Street, stands an iconic statue familiar to both tourist and local alike, a figure that since it’s unveiling in 1935, has quietly borne witness to the endless flow of people that daily pass along…

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National Trust – now in the hands of cretins

News from the front in Britain. The institution created to care for the aesthetic and cultural inheritance left by our forefathers – The National Trust – is now in the hands of utter cretins. The rot set in some years ago when the institution was infiltrated by Lefty Metrosexual board…

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Nature is the guide for everything

Nature inspires true art. Not just visually but technically, and spiritually, through equations such as the golden mean. The beautiful fractal complexity which Europeans mimicked so well, for so long, in their art and architecture, which is the same seen in folded leaves and snowflakes. That refraction of the grand mystery,…

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The Individualism of the Herd

It is fair to say, that many of the values and viewpoints understood as being normative in Western society today, represent a near total inversion of those regarded as such by our recent forebears. Indeed, such marked reversals of thought and attitude are not apolitical or happenstance, but are taken in…

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Trajan’s monumental triumph

As monuments go, they don’t get much better than Trajan’s Column in terms of artistry, longevity and impact. Not only did it influence other architectural and artistic gems over the centuries, in the past 26 years it has made a profound mark on graphic design – particularly cinema posters. The…

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Power of Primordial myth: Oberon, elf king

Oberon is king of the faeries. He appears in medieval and Renaissance literature, most famously in William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, in which Oberon quarrels with his wife Titania, the faerie queen, over a changeling child. But his legend in more deep-seated than people realize, and is a mysterious mythical figure worthy…

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From the ground to the stars: Perseus freeing Andromeda

Perseus freeing Andromeda, 1791, terracotta, 129×50×69 cm – Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyon (France) by Joseph Chinard. Here we see the perfect illustration of the purity of traditional art, and the aesthetic of the hand made, of quality over quantity, of craft over industry. A highly refined sculpture in the medium…